Region inspires sea shanties

BAYSIDE BALLAD: Adam Hardcastle performs one of his original sea shanties "The Night we sighted the Otway" at Port MacDonnell.  Picture: BRITTANY DENTON

BAYSIDE BALLAD: Adam Hardcastle performs one of his original sea shanties "The Night we sighted the Otway" at Port MacDonnell. Picture: BRITTANY DENTON


COMPOSING traditional sea shanties inspired by the Shipwreck Coast, Adam Hardcastle immersed himself in the life of a 19th century Portland resident last month.

Eating a Victorian-era diet and writing his "blog" by hand using calligraphy ink, Mr Hardcastle stepped back in time to tell stories from the point of view of locals living in the seaside town in the late 1800s.

"I lived in Portland for a month during June as an Artist in Residence, researching the history of the surrounding coastal region with the intention of writing sea shanties - the songs sailors used to keep a rhythm when lifting a sail and for particular jobs," Mr Hardcastle told The Border Watch.

"I have an interest in work songs and I've spent a bit of time researching women's wool kneading songs in Scotland - quite often they write these songs because they need to entertain themselves and the tempo was exactly what they needed.

For the full story see today's print edition of The Border Watch or subscribe to our eEdition at eedition.borderwatch.com.au.

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